Whack! You’ve had a sudden knock to the head and suddenly you find yourself in pain and in a fog. A trip to the emergency room and a few doctor visits later and it’s confirmed: you have a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Whether you got it playing a contact sport, whiplash from a car crash, or falling on a slippery sidewalk, dealing with a concussion can be an ordeal. But with proper diagnosis and treatment, you can recover and get back to your regular routine.

Concussions are usually caused by a direct or indirect hit to the head. This trauma leads to internal bleeding, bruising, fluid build-up, tissue damage, or increased pressure on your brain. Some concussions can lead to cognitive, physical, or emotional problems. You may find it hard to concentrate or feel in a fog. You may experience headaches, tiredness, dizziness, and memory loss. The symptoms will vary according to your specific injury and so too will the treatment. That’s why the first thing to do is to seek immediate medical help. An early diagnosis and treatment plan can optimize your recovery.

A concussion can have serious repercussions in the short and long term. This is why any concussion should be taken seriously. It’s also why so much attention is given to athletes who have suffered a concussion. From professional leagues to school teams, athletes, coaches, teachers, parents, and the general public take concussions much more seriously than in the past. You should, too.

Concussion Recovery

The first step is to seek and follow medical advice. That means slowing things down, resting, and taking it easy for a bit. Returning too quickly to your regular activity can prolong or worsen your symptoms.

Research on concussions is evolving and we learn more and more with each breakthrough. Aside from following doctor’s orders, here are some things you can do improve your recovery:

You should also discuss your concussion with your family and employer. You’re going to have to rely on loved ones for physical and emotional support and most employers offer programs, benefits, or allowances to help with employees who have been injured. Talk to them and get the help you need to ensure a full recovery.

For more information

 

Contact Us

If you or someone you know has suffered a serious head injury as a result of a crash, accident, or someone’s negligence, you have rights. Contact us today to discuss how our team can help you get on the path to recovery.

You’re in the stands cheering on your kid as he or she is playing their favourite sport, when suddenly, they take a hard hit to the head. You panic, rush to the sidelines, and make sure they are alright.

Checking for signs of a possible concussion, you and the coach agree to remove your child from the game and you head straight to the doctor.

Well done! The first step is to always take a significant hit to the head seriously. Here are some of the symptoms to watch for:

Most symptoms show up within minutes or hours, but others may take longer to appear. Getting to the hospital is always the right thing to do.

But what happens after the doctor confirms a concussion? What does the road to recovery look like and what should you do as a parent?

While each concussion is different, medical experts pinpoint early detection and brain rest as the first steps to helping concussed kids recover more completely. At their young ages, the brain is still developing and improper diagnosis, treatment, or too quick of a return to normal activity may lead to long-term problems.

Pediatric neurologists say that at minimum, two or three days of rest can help with such blows to the brain. That doesn’t just mean no sports or running around, but also no electronic devices, school work, video games, and anything else that can challenge or stress the brain.

A hard hit needs to be taken seriously. In Canada, 39% of all kids between 10 and 18 who visited an emergency facility following a sports-related head injuries were diagnosed with a concussion, while another 24% showed signs of possible concussion. Three sports in particular – football, soccer, and hockey – show a greater increase in reported head injuries in the decade between 2004 and 2014. Of course, sports are not the only cause of a concussion: falls, car crashes, and other whacks to the head can also cause a concussion. But no matter the cause of the injury, your focus needs to be on treatment and recovery.

There’s good news, though! Medical researchers in Nebraska found that 80 to 90% of sport concussions resolve in two to three weeks. This is if the child has been treated and follows medical advice. Doing so can also help prevent more serious brain injuries at a time when the child is vulnerable to other jolts to the head. If the problem persists beyond that point, another trip to the doctor is in order.

Catching a concussion early, preventing further activity, and seeking immediate medical attention are all helpful steps to healthy attitudes and healthy kids.

https://youtu.be/9s9TGc2DTPg

For more information

If you’ve ever had a concussion, you know recovery takes a while. It can be hard to think clearly or perform some routine functions for some time. So what about driving? New research is showing that in many cases, driving after a concussion is a dangerous idea.

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that concussed drivers show some very erratic driving behaviours that linger well after the initial injury. Using a driving simulator (similar to the one used by the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in the video below), the team tested reactions to various driving situations, as well as everyday conditions.

Two tests were run and compared. The first was within two days of the injury. They then repeated it when the test subjects said they were no longer feeling the effects of their concussion.

Julianne Schmidt led the study. She noted that concussed drivers in the simulation had showed a number of potentially dangerous driving patterns. “They swerved more within the lane,” she said. “This is a pretty large indicator of motor vehicle accident risk, and this is at a time point when they are considered recovered.”

Some of the reactions in the test were described as being like those of a drunk driver.

If you have suffered a concussion, be very cautious about driving. Depending on the severity of your injury, it may not even be an option for a long time. Always seek advice from medical professionals and get help from your friends and family before you get behind the wheel. You don’t want to put your life and others in danger.

So if you’ve had a concussion or think you’ve suffered one:

And remember, there are services available to help you with your concussion recovery and getting you back on track.

For more information

Concussions are mysterious to many of us but medical science is getting better at understanding how to test, treat, and aid recovery from them. Here are three recent breakthroughs you should know about – two of them from right here in Canada.

New blood test for concussions

A Canadian team of researchers have made a major discovery in how to identify and diagnose patients with a concussion. The answer may be in your blood. The team has found a blood test that they claim has a 90 per cent rate of accuracy.

Currently, concussions are diagnosed by medical imaging technology or a complex list of observations and physical tests. A blood test, though, would simplify the process and enable medical professionals to diagnose and treat concussions faster.

The blood test measures metabolite levels in the blood. These leave chemical fingerprints that can tell what’s happening in the brain. While it’s not the first time researchers have looked to blood tests to try and diagnose concussions, this is one of the most promising findings for early detection.

Blood protein a measure of severity

If you’ve ever had a concussion, you know it can be both a painful and confusing experience with a long and unpredictable recovery ahead. Researchers in New York State have discovered that, once again, our blood can help determine the severity of the concussion with a view to predicting recovery time.

In a study of concussed athletes, they discovered that a higher level of the brain protein tau in the blood can lead to a longer recovery period. Tau is a protein found in the human body and is linked to brain cell damage. Higher levels in the blood indicate a more severe injury.

In the test group, the athletes with high levels took longer than 10 days to return to play while those with less got back sooner. While more research is needed, the results have researchers hopeful that measuring tau proteins in the blood can help with diagnosing the severity of a concussion and predicting a patient’s recovery time.

Light exercise can help recovery in kids

Another Canadian team has found light exercise may help some concussed kids recover faster. Resting and slowing down have been common treatments for concussions, but researchers in Ottawa have found that light physical activity can help mend some young brains.

Looking at over 3000 youngsters ages 5 to 18 who were treated for concussions, the team found that those who did some light physical activity in the first week after their injury saw faster improvements than those who did not. For those restricted to bed rest, nearly half (44%) continued to show symptoms a month later, while a quarter of those who were out doing light walks, swimming, or stationary cycling reported fewer lingering symptoms in the same time frame.

Certainly, if a child has suffered a concussion as a result of a sporting activity, he or she should be pulled from play, but it is promising to see the positive impact of light exercise on their recovery.

For more information

Contact Us

Don’t let an injury put your life on hold. Contact us today to discuss how our team can help with your recovery.

All it takes is one blow to the head and your life can be changed forever. Concussions are becoming all too common, especially among young people. And new research is showing that the consequences of just one concussion can have long-term effects on your mental, intellectual, and physical abilities.

Scientists from universities in the US, the UK, and Sweden collaborated on the study. Looking at a set of Swedish people who had suffered a head injury before age 25, they made some startling discoveries.

The first finding is economic in nature. Those who had experienced just one concussion or mild traumatic brain injury in their youth were much more likely to be receiving disability payments as an adult. They were also less likely to have finished high school or to have moved on to higher education or training.

The group also experienced more health problems. They were more likely to seek help for mental health issues, they suffered more lingering physical problems, and were more likely to die early in life. The situation was worse for a concussion after the age of 15 – an important time in human development when the brain is still growing.

That’s also an age when a lot of kids are heavily involved in sports with a higher risk of head injury, such as hockey, soccer, rugby, and football. All the more reason to make sure your kids are playing safe and wearing protective gear. And if they do get hurt, it’s why you should pull them out of play. Their future health and success is far more important than a high school trophy.

For more information

A new sport season is about to kick off and that means all sorts of active fun. But are your kids playing it safe? If they do get hurt, do you know how to identify a concussion? And do you know what to do? These are questions every parent should be asking themselves whenever their child begins a sport.

A fall, a bump, a knock, or blow to the body can happen in almost any sport. But if the force from that hit affects your head, it can injure your brain and leave you with a concussion.

Kids are more susceptible to suffering a concussion because their bodies haven’t fully developed. They’re smaller, have weaker muscles, and thinner skulls than adults. They’re also more active, rambunctious, and not fully aware of the risks.

While we hear a lot about concussions in contact sports like football and hockey, it doesn’t mean those are the only ones. Young athletes can also get concussed taking part in all sorts of sports activities – soccer, skiing, field hockey, and cycling.

If your child has taken hit to the head, you need to know what to watch for. Common concussion symptoms include:

If any of these symptoms are present and you think your kid has suffered a concussion, take immediate action. The first step is an immediate stop to all play. No sporting moment, big or small, is worth risking your child’s health. After that, seek medical help. That means a trip to the emergency room or the family doctor for a proper assessment. Once they’re home, keep them hydrated, rested, and off the field of play. Recovering from a concussion is a serious matter and it takes time.

If left untreated, a concussion can lead to bigger problems down the road – including permanent brain injury and even death. And no game or trophy is worth risking that.

For more information

Five years ago, a young hockey player at the top of his game sustained a couple of heavy blows to his head. The resulting concussion was devastating – sidelining his career and putting his health in serious jeopardy. With June being Brain Injury Awareness Month across Canada, we immediately think of this man’s accomplishments and struggles with brain injury.

This week, that young man is making a triumphant return to the arena where he has long made his mark. You may have heard of him. His name is Sidney Crosby. And this week he is making his third appearance in a Stanley Cup Final – the first since sustaining a serious concussion in January of 2011.

Of course, Vancouverites will know Sid the Kid by his Golden Goal. The whole city – indeed the whole of Canada – cheered ecstatically when he brought down the curtain on the 2010 Olympics with that breathtaking goal in overtime against the American squad.

Sadly, a year later, Number 87’s spectacular career was thrown into a tailspin following his concussion. His recovery lasted years. So as he laced up this week for his latest appearance in the Stanley Cup Finals, we remember the long road he took to get here.

Of course, you don’t have to be an Olympic or Stanley Cup champion to know or suffer the impact of a brain injury. That’s what Brain Injury Awareness Month is all about.

According to the Brain Injury Association of Canada, 160,000 Canadians sustain a brain injury each year and over a million live with the effects of an acquired brain injury. The statistics also show that half of those injuries result from falls and motor vehicle accidents.

The good news is that many brain injuries are preventable, especially in sports. The first tip is to always wear a helmet when biking, playing contact sports, or engaging in activities like rollerblading, skiing, or snowboarding where falls are common. Helmets do not always prevent concussions, but properly designed and fitted helmets are your best first line of defense.

Of course, not everything in life can be prevented. Car crashes, falls, and other events can’t be anticipated. Fortunately, the majority of brain injuries are treatable if diagnosed early enough. If you’ve been in an accident or fall and think you’ve sustained a brain injury, go get treatment!

A brain injury is always something to take seriously. Without proper attention, diagnosis, and treatment, the situation can easily worsen with further problems developing down the road. The impact of a brain injury can take only seconds to happen but it can last a lifetime.

For more information

A Virginia Tech study concludes that at least 28% of all hockey helmets are unsafe to wear based on their ability to prevent concussions. These tests include helmets worn by both the NHL and youth leagues.

Hockey helmets were awarded one to five stars based on a grading system that took three years and $500,000 to develop. No funding was received from the helmet industry.

32 helmets were tested.

Hockey players wearing the “not recommended” helmets risk incurring at least six concussions per season, and in some cases more than eight, according to Virginia Tech.

Ann McKee is the woman at the forefront of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) research.  She is a professor of neurology and pathology at the Boston University School of Medicine and director of Boston University’s CTE Center.

CTE is a degenerative brain disease found in athletes who have endured repetitive head trauma. Because of the NFL concussion lawsuit, CTE is most often associated with football players, but the disease also affects soccer, hockey, rugby and baseball players.

McKee’s research on CTE is funded by several organizations including the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and the National Football League.

McKee recently discussed her work on CTE in an interview with Boston University. “I looked at the slide and it was like ‘Oh my God! This is so amazing. I’ve never seen anything like this’” she recalls on the first time she saw CTE. In McKee’s examination of professional boxer Peter Pender’s brain in 2003, she discovered tangles of protein clustered around blood vessels called tau, the first indicator of CTE.

McKee also discusses the 240 brains in the CTE Center’s bank, brain injury in kids’ sports, and what shocks her most about CTE. Read the full interview on BU’s Research.

For More Information

Years of “tombstone piledrivers”, “chair shots”, and “flying head butts” have caused former wrestlers of the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) to follow in the footsteps of former NHL and NFL players.

According to CNN, two former pro-wrestlers, one who performed under the name Skull Von Krush, have filed a concussion lawsuit against the WWE.

“Under the guise of providing entertainment, the WWE has, for decades, subjected its wrestlers to extreme physical brutality that it knew, or should have known, caused … long-term irreversible bodily damage, including brain damage,” the lawsuit said.

The two former pro wrestlers, Vito LoGrasso, 50, and Evan Singleton, 20, say that the WWE encouraged excessive violence leading to both of them to suffer from serious neurological damage. According to the lawsuit, LoGrasso now suffers from “serious neurological damage” and has memory loss, depression and anxiety. Singleton was one of the youngest wrestler in WWE history and now has “an array of serious symptoms,” including tremors, convulsions, memory loss and “impaired ability to reason”.

The lawsuit also mentions how former wrestlers Christ Benoit and Andrew “Test”  Martin, were found to have chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in their brains due to repeated head trauma. CTE is associated with memory loss, confusion, depression, aggression and eventual dementia.

“The WWE has never concealed any medical information related to concussions, or otherwise from our talent,” said the WWE’s attorney, “We will vigorously contest this lawsuit.”

For More Information: