Back to School Safety Tips for Motorists - Slater Vecchio
September.14.2015

Back to School Safety Tips for Motorists

school safety vancouver

Our children are walking and cycling to school, and for some it is the first time. Vancouver Police are reminding motorists to slow down and pay attention in school zones. According to The Province, police and speed watch volunteers are strictly enforcing the 30-km/h speed limit in school zones between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

According to ICBC, 30 children aged five to eighteen are killed and 5,100 injured in 14,700 crashes every year in BC.

Here are some back to school traffic safety tips for motorists

  • Don’t be a distracted driver. Put away your smartphone and put down your coffee. Remember, distracted driving is deadlier than drunk driving.
  • Always pay attention, slow down in school zones and yield to pedestrians.
  • Watch for kids crossing in between parked cars and getting off school buses.
  • Plan ahead by designating a safe and easily accessible drop-off and pick-up spot. Remember, routes with less traffic in the summer may now face heavy traffic, so leave a few minutes earlier.
  • Respect no parking or no stopping zones, even if it’s just for a few minutes.
  • When dropping off children at school make sure they get out on the sidewalk side of the car.

BC motorists need to be vigilant and use caution on the road. By adjusting driving routines, drivers can improve pedestrian safety and reduce child pedestrian injuries.

“Sadly, car crashes are still the number one preventable cause of death for youth in BC,” said Jill Blacklock, manager, Road Safety Delivery, ICBC in a recent VCB article. “Every year in BC there are 16,655 crashes involving children aged 5-18 resulting in 5,350 injuries and 36 deaths including child pedestrians, cyclists and vehicle passengers.”

For more information

Michael Slater QC

Michael Slater, QC

Michael Slater QC is the founding partner of Slater Vecchio. The majority of his practice is confined to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury cases.