April.28.2017

Let’s All Share the Seawall

Vancouver Seawall safety

Like cherry blossoms and daffodils, every spring in Vancouver sees the return of something truly spectacular – thousands of people out enjoying the Seawall. But 30 kms of seaside trails can result in conflicts between people wheeling it and people heeling it. Cyclists, rollerbladers, pedestrians, and joggers need to share the Seawall and follow the rules.

You’ve probably experienced it. Out for a sunny stroll near Granville Island when a speeding cyclist takes a turn too quickly and nearly crashes into you. Or you’re enjoying a leisurely bike ride around Stanley Park when a group of walkers and gawkers wanders off the pedestrian path and into the bike route to snap photos of the totem poles.

It can be frustrating and dangerous.

As the crown jewel of the city, the Seawall is meant to be enjoyed. Here are four easy things you can do to make it a safer, more delightful experience for everyone.

Stick to your lane

There’s a simple reason why most of the Seawall has two separate lanes: it’s safer that way. While there are spots where space is limited and the path has to be shared, it is mostly separated into two well-marked lanes. Generally, people on foot take the water side and their trail is often “bumpy” (made of paver bricks, cobblestones, or grooved concrete). The path for the faster moving wheeled set is on the inside and is smooth (except in shared areas where the “bumps” help slow those wheels down). If that isn’t apparent, there are signs to let you know which lane is yours. Stick to your side and stay safe.

Watch your speed

If you’re on fast-moving wheels – mostly bikes and inline skates – mind your speed and stick to your paths. You’re travelling at a faster pace than walkers or runners and need more space for sudden stops. And in case you didn’t know, the Seawall has a speed limit: 15 km/h. And yes, police will enforce it. For runners, be mindful of pedestrians ahead and navigate your way through them carefully when going by.

Beware of sticky points

While you should be careful and alert at all times, there are a few areas where things get quite congested and require much more caution and attention. These include areas:

  • around the Vancouver Convention Centre
  • at the Coal Harbour entrance to Stanley Park
  • near Granville Island
  • along English Bay near Denman Street and Beach Avenue
  • and of course, where paths narrow or are shared

If you decide to skip Vancouver’s Seawall for West Vancouver’s Seawalk, leave your wheeled equipment at home. Bikes and rollerblades are not permitted there. Check local rules for what’s allowed on other municipal trials and paths.

Share and share alike

There are some parts of the Seawall where there’s just not enough room for separate paths (like just west of the Lions Gate Bridge in Stanley Park or near Leg-in-Boot Square on False Creek). In these areas, you have to share the path and the responsibility for safety.

Another thing to share is this message: the Seawall is for everyone’s enjoyment but it also has rules, including rules of etiquette. Ring your bell when you’re biking by and politely point out to people if they’re not in the correct lane. Keep your dogs on a leash, a close eye on your kids, and don’t get your head stuck in your phone when you’re walking through busy parts of the Seawall. Just a few simple things can make for a great day on our magnificent crown jewel.

For more information

David McCormick

David McCormick

David joined Slater Vecchio in May 2013. He began his legal career as a criminal prosecutor where he was involved in cases involving dangerous driving, driving without due car and attention, impaired driving, and more.